Time To Change? How To Know?

Companies with little interest in pushing the boundaries won’t benefit a lot from a serious change program. Nor will companies that lack a sense of urgency. But, for determined organizations facing critical opportunities to accelerate, this is a great time to embark on the valuable path of change.
I’ve put together a shortlist of questions to help you know if your organization would benefit from a change agenda:
  • Is your company in a position to accelerate? If not, what’s in the way?
  • Are you positioned for value – or are you selling based on features, functions or price?
  • Are you a thought leader in your market space?
  • Is your competitive environment exploding in a frenzy of hype?
  • Do you have a new offering that could leapfrog you into a desirable new position?
  • Do you have big news that could change the face of your company?
  • Do you have what it takes to challenge the big dogs? Or are you a big dog feeling the heat from challengers?
  • Are you limited in your ability to reach up and over in your best customers?
  • Are you seeing effective collaboration between marketing, product, and sales?
  • Do you have the critical talent to push your brand promise to the next level?
  • Is your company being valued fairly?  Are you at risk of becoming a commodity?
If you were to honestly answer the questions posed above, what would you learn? Is it time to change? If so, what’s stopping you?

3 Comments

  1. Tom Butta says:

    There are certainly other questions to consider, but this list includes a set of common issues I've seen in the various change programs I've been involved with. What questions jump out for you?

  2. Tom Butta says:

    A really important question every leader must ask themselves before taking on a change program is this: Does transformation motivate you? It’s such an important issue that I featured it as its own blog earlier this year.

  3. James says:

    I've been working on a study recently … about transformation project leaders. The best ones are brought in from the outside to drive change … people who have a clear understanding of what it really takes to manage the transition. The findings make a good case for hired guns in the "change" department.

Leave a Reply to James Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>